[1] Kenhardt

A town so true to the saying...

A town so true to the saying…

150 KM from Brandvlei via the R27, lies Kenhardt. The road runs straight through and alongside several large vloere . The road skirts the largest of all the pans, Grootvloer (‘large floor’), which begins about 40 km north of Brandvlei. It covers about 300 square km.
There are virtually no trees on the stony plains between Brandvlei and Kenhardt. A few thorn trees decorate the riverbanks of the Sak, Sout & Hartbees.

A Quiver tree forest a few km outside town.

A Quiver tree forest a few km outside town.

8km south of Kenhardt, is a Quiver Tree Forest with 4000 to 5000 of these unique trees.
Due to the absence of trees in this area, the large numbers of social weavers have to make do with roadside telegraph poles for their huge communal nests. These nests can be home to more than 150 birds and can last for many years.
Kenhardt started as a police outpost on 27 December 1868. Their duty was to protect the farmers from live-stock theft. New arrivals settled around the police outpost.

the church in town

the church in town

In 1889 the Dutch Reformed Church established a new parish.
Sheep farming is the main economic activity in the district.   Wheat farming along the river courses flourish due to the saaidam system and irrigation provided from the Rooidam on the Hartbees. Water for domestic use is derived from wells and boreholes.
The town is an important road junction.
Attractions

  • The Camel-thorn Tree – five to six centuries old – declared a national monument
  • The old library building - constructed in 1897 and used until 1977 - also a national monument
  • A memorial for two Cape Afrikaner rebels who were executed during the Anglo-Boer War.